2013 Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance: 1929 duPont Model G Merrimac Speedster

1929 du Pont G

The duPont family had amassed a vast fortune by the turn of the 20th century, and members of the family were beginning to try their hands at other ventures. For E. Paul duPont the venture was into the realm of luxury automobiles. His aim was to make the most luxurious car in the world, a hefty task with competition from the likes of Duesenberg, Stutz, and Cadillac at the time.

The duPont Model G was brought out as a response to the mighty Duesenberg J, which completely reset the standards of the day. The Model G featured a new Continental 5.3L inline eight cylinder engine that made anywhere from 114hp to 140hp. The Speedster you see here was constructed by the coach-builder Merrimac. Around 200 duPont Model Gs were built in total, making it the most popular duPont model built before the company stopped production in 1931.

I haven’t seen too many of these around, and this Model G really caught my eye at this year’s Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance. I’ve always been a sucker for black and red color schemes, and with its white-wall tires, this car was just gorgeous. Enjoy the photos.

1929 du Pont G

1929 du Pont G

1929 du Pont G

1929 du Pont G

1929 du Pont G

1929 du Pont G

1929 du Pont G

1929 du Pont G

1929 du Pont G

1929 du Pont G

1929 du Pont G

-Nick Walker

5 thoughts on “2013 Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance: 1929 duPont Model G Merrimac Speedster”

  1. What a beautiful car!!! Thanks for sharing these pictures. The mainstream cars of today all look pretty much the same. Unfortunately the cars with character, like the Pagani Huayra for example, are way beyond the reach of all but the richest people.

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    1. That they are. Even when a design renaissance does eventually happen, we won’t see things like they were in the 1920s-30s. It will be different, but prewar cars will always be something extremely special.

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