Freiburger and Finnegan find the dirtiest Mustang ever–and save it.

Normally, I’m not a big Mustang guy. I usually go after Barracudas from the Sixties and Seventies, because I’m more of a Plymouth guy for that era. But, I make some exceptions, and Roadkill, my personal favorite YouTube show, resurrected this derelict, nasty, trashed old Mustang from a boneyard in Colorado, and got it home. I won’t reveal any details but for this–do not watch this one on a full stomach, because this is one of the most far-gone cars I’ve seen these two rescue. Watch it!

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This 1914 Rolls Royce Silver Ghost Alpine Model took Best in Show at Misselwood

1914 Rolls Royce Silver Ghost Misselwood 22

I knew this unbelievable 1914 Rolls Royce Alpine Model would win Best in Show the moment it pulled up to the preview for the Misselwood Concours. There were tons of stunning cars there, but this thing had that “pop” that separates the royalty from the mere aristocracy.

This Rolls is pre-war, but we’re talking pre-World War 1. That’s right, this magnificent automobile existed when men were still riding into battle on horseback. It’s one of just 4 Rolls Royces assembled in the US before the onset of The Great War, and it remains as grand a Rolls as any since.

This car’s body and chassis, separated in 1983, were just reunited in 2015, and a lot of work was put in to bring it to the beautiful condition you see here. It totally took my breath away, and I shot literally hundreds of photos of it. What’s even better is the owner told me he drives the car around 5,000 miles per year on various rallies. He said concours events are a secondary concern to actually using and enjoying the car. You gotta love that, it’s a concours winner and it’s not a trailer queen.

Ladies and gentlemen, this is how it’s supposed to be done. Enjoy the gallery of this immaculate Rolls Royce, and you can find a little more info on it at the bottom.

Continue reading This 1914 Rolls Royce Silver Ghost Alpine Model took Best in Show at Misselwood

Alfa Romeo 1750 Berlina spotted in Greenwich, CT

Alfa 1750 Front

Even as you leave Greenwich, you’re bound to see some nice cars on the way home. This time, I only had to walk a few feet from the car to glimpse one of the finest looking sedans of the 1960s. This little Alfa 1750 was taking up space, and time, in the parking deck, and showing off its best lines while I took a few pictures. It’s a shame that they don’t make cars like this anymore. Enjoy the photos.

This BMW Isetta 300 gave my day some hot pink style at the Lane Motor Museum

BMW Isetta Lane Museum 1

Hot pink and yellow, now there’s some style for your Monday. This BMW Isetta 300 immediately caught my eye when I walked into the Lane Motor Museum in Nashville, Tennessee. Who wouldn’t want to take this thing for a ride?

Enjoy!

Continue reading This BMW Isetta 300 gave my day some hot pink style at the Lane Motor Museum

The Lincoln Mark VII Chronicles, Part IV: Back In The Saddle Again (briefly)

Lincoln Mark VII Front 2

By December, the Mark VII was sitting in the garage, in from the cold but not forgotten. I got car parts for my birthday, including a new set of front air springs, a compressor, and rebuild kits for each front solenoid. While I successfully installed everything, the rear failed while fixing the front. Continue reading The Lincoln Mark VII Chronicles, Part IV: Back In The Saddle Again (briefly)

1967 Pontiac GTO at the Misselwood Concours

1967 Pontiac GTO Front

Pontiac, before General Motors decided to kill the brand, made some of my favorite mid-priced cars. While some scorn and say that they were just Chevrolets with some extra body cladding, there was a time where that just wasn’t true. Back in the 1960s, John Z. Delorean wanted to put some pep in the General’s step–and he decided to use a time honored formula of taking a big engine and cramming it into a car smaller than normal. The new Tempest was a great candidate, being Pontiac’s newest intermediate in 1964, so it was chosen. Then, a 389 cubic inch V8 was bolted in, and the car was sent off to showrooms.
Continue reading 1967 Pontiac GTO at the Misselwood Concours

Lexus LC 500 Review: Lexus Has Finally Found Their Form

Lexus LC 500 Review 8

Luxury isn’t about needs, luxury is about wants, or rather, desires. Practical concerns come second to delivering a highly remarkable experience. A luxury object is an art form, and it must appeal deeply to human emotion, even at the expense of being practical or being objectively inane.

The upscale part of Toyota, Lexus has always been extremely focused on delivering on practical concerns. They have the best reputation for build quality in the entire industry, and their cars have always been solid. A Lexus has always been a nice and dependable way to get around, but they never really rose above being just a well-polished transportation appliance. They never evoked any sort of deep carnal desire, or had a sense of occasion that made you want to go out and drive just for the hell of it.

Since 2008, Lexus has been taking serious steps to spice up their brand and make themselves a player in the true luxury segment. It’s a marketplace where people want something genuinely special, not just a Camry fitted with leather and wood. Lexus needed to define their own unique experience, and boy have they made moves in the years since.

This is the new Lexus LC 500, and it just might be the best GT car you can buy for $100 grand.

Continue reading Lexus LC 500 Review: Lexus Has Finally Found Their Form

Mike Musto checks out some ratty muscle cars, for our entertainment.

Three years ago, Nick and I met Mike Musto, a man with enough personality to fill all of Middlesex and Mercer County and a big fan of old-school muscle cars (my sort of thing). His new show, House of Muscle, is a show that’s absolutely worth watching. In this latest episode, he ends up in a little rural part of Alabama and shows us all some muscle car clones that aren’t perfect, but are a blast to drive and aren’t trailer queens. These are cars that are run hard, put away wet, and maintained the way the owners want, not how the collectors demand. It’s always great to see folks with old cars like these actually run them around and use them. While I own a car that’s far newer (my beat up Lincoln, which currently isn’t running thanks to an engine problem), it isn’t perfect either–and this man from Alabama deserves my respect.

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A Journal About Life As A Car Lover

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