Mike Musto checks out some ratty muscle cars, for our entertainment.

Three years ago, Nick and I met Mike Musto, a man with enough personality to fill all of Middlesex and Mercer County and a big fan of old-school muscle cars (my sort of thing). His new show, House of Muscle, is a show that’s absolutely worth watching. In this latest episode, he ends up in a little rural part of Alabama and shows us all some muscle car clones that aren’t perfect, but are a blast to drive and aren’t trailer queens. These are cars that are run hard, put away wet, and maintained the way the owners want, not how the collectors demand. It’s always great to see folks with old cars like these actually run them around and use them. While I own a car that’s far newer (my beat up Lincoln, which currently isn’t running thanks to an engine problem), it isn’t perfect either–and this man from Alabama deserves my respect.

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1970 Plymouth Superbird at the Misselwood Tour d’Elegance

1970 Torred Superbird Front 2

Even though this Superbird wasn’t present at the Misselwood Concours, it participated in the Tour d’Elegance the day before. I’ve been a longtime fan of the wild wing cars, and this one certainly kept my attention. Sporting Tor-Red paint and bench seats, its unusual combination of a column shift and the wing car body was a fetching and unusual presentation. Continue reading 1970 Plymouth Superbird at the Misselwood Tour d’Elegance

1957 Porsche 356A Cabriolet at the Misselwood Concours

Porsche 356A Cabriolet Misselwood 1

Check out the color combo on thisĀ 1957 Porsche 356A Cabriolet. Forest green over tan leather with a magnificent white steering wheel.

I see a lot of Porsche 356s at these events, and I often don’t pay them much mind unless they are a unique color combo. This one was a fine example.

Enjoy the photos.

Continue reading 1957 Porsche 356A Cabriolet at the Misselwood Concours

1934 Packard 1104 Convertible at the Misselwood Concours

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This incredible Packard is one of those cars that fits exactly the style we imagine when we think of pre-war cars. It looks like it’s straight out of The Great Gatsby.

Enjoy the gallery of this classic machine!

Continue reading 1934 Packard 1104 Convertible at the Misselwood Concours

1962 Lincoln Continental Convertible spotted in Greenwich, CT

1961 Lincoln Continental Convertible Front

There’s something eerie about the Continental. This was a car that started Lincoln into a short era of understated class, just in time for the Sixties to start. Sales hit near-record highs compared to previous seasons and buyers absolutely loved the new look, so much in fact that it wasn’t until the glitzy and ritzy Continental Mark III came out in 1968 that Lincoln went back to the excesses we know and love today (as much as the early ones). This ’62 looked straight as a die and was ready for a night out on the town–even though it wasn’t even 10AM yet when I took these pictures.

1961 Lincoln Continental Convertible Rear

-Albert S. Davis

The mighty little Autozam AZ1 at the Misselwood Concours

Autozam AZ1 Misselwood 10

When you tell someone you drive a turbocharged mid engined sports car with gullwing doors, they may expect you to roll up in a Pagani Huayra. Imagine the look of surprise on their face when you roll up in this, an Autozam AZ1, instead.

It’s part of an interesting Japanese segment known as a kei cars, or “light cars.” The segment included other passenger vehicles like vans and such, but the Autozam AZ1 was a kei sports car.

Autozam was sold as a sub-brand of Mazda, but the AZ1 had a turbocharged 657cc Suzuki engine under it’s hood. It makes 64hp and 63 ft/lbs of torque, but that’s not actually too bad in a car weighing only 1,500lbs. It’s the gullwing go kart of your wildest dreams.

Despite being a small bite of awesome today, the Autozam AZ1 was not successful in its day. It launched in 1992, right as a recession was taking hold in Japan, and the AZ1 was seen as too expensive for its market segment. As a result, only 4,392 Autozam AZ1s were built, making it the rarest of the kei sports cars out there.

It certainly has a lot of flavor, and who doesn’t love those gullwing doors? It’s a proper bite sized exotic!

Enjoy the photos!

Continue reading The mighty little Autozam AZ1 at the Misselwood Concours

1976 Cadillac Eldorado Bicentennial Edition at the 2017 Greenwich Concours

Eldorado Bicentennial Front

Happy Birthday, America. You aren’t perfect, but I love you anyway. Just like this Cadillac. In 1976, the USA turned a nice, round 200 years old. Things were, to say, a bit off-kilter in the world of American cars. The muscle car era was dead and gone. Imports were starting to take the domestic companies’ lunch and dinner away. And safety mavens (or so they called themselves) had put to death the classic American big convertible. As safety regulations began to tighten more and more, less companies were inclined to build convertibles. By 1976, only one major American car company still had a convertible in their lineup, and it was Cadillac. Stubborn to the end, the Eldorado marketing team wanted to send their flagship (and it sure was a flagship, with sharp lines, king-size proportions, an incredible menu of standard equipment for the era, and a ride soft enough to keep a baby sleeping for hundreds of miles) out in style. Continue reading 1976 Cadillac Eldorado Bicentennial Edition at the 2017 Greenwich Concours

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A Journal About Life As A Car Lover

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