All posts by Albert S. Davis

“Mocha Latte” Dodge Charger Hellcat at the 2018 Scarsdale Concours

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Hellcats are not cars to be taken lightly. Nor are they for the faint of heart, mind, or soul. With 707 hp on tap, one hit of the gas is enough to change your life–much like drinking grain alcohol all night long. This color scheme from 2018’s Scarsdale Concours looks like a Starbucks drink, with off-white paint and brown stripes. I’m a fan of this finish, especially with the dark alloy rims characteristic of the Hellcat. Enjoy the photos of this white-chocolate mocha latte Hellcat. It’s Cars…and Coffee! Continue reading “Mocha Latte” Dodge Charger Hellcat at the 2018 Scarsdale Concours

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1981 Cadillac V8-6-4 in the AACA Hershey Car Corral

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To the untrained eye, this is just a Cadillac DeVille from the Malaise Era. But to someone with a trained eye, this is a Malaise Era unicorn. Today, cylinder deactivation, or variable displacement, is much more commonplace and considered to be a reliable, smooth way for a large engine to achieve the fuel economy of a smaller one and still retain its performance potential. The theory was there as early as 1980 but the transister technology and computer control technology was simply not up to the task. Cadillac tried to use this feature on the V8-6-4 engine in most of their 1981 models but the system proved to be mostly unreliable to the point of exasperating its well-heeled and high-income clientele. The system would be pulled for 1982 in favor of the new HT4100 V8, which was even less well-recieved thanks to its lack of horsepower. Continue reading 1981 Cadillac V8-6-4 in the AACA Hershey Car Corral

American Motors at Radwood and AACA Hershey

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When Saturday is at Hershey and Sunday is at Radwood, you’re gauranteed to see some American Motors product in the flesh, whether it’s a little Gremlin, a gorgeous Rebel Machine, or even a late-model Jeep Grand Wagoneer. Luckily for my star-studded eyes, it was all there to see in all its glory. Enjoy the photos of some American Motors, from 1970 to 1987. Continue reading American Motors at Radwood and AACA Hershey

Yellow Superbird at the 2018 Hershey AACA Fall Meet

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Plymouth’s Win-You-Over Beat Goes On, they said. The year was 1970. The muscle car era was at its peak, and Plymouth had an ace in the hole with the Superbird. They took the Road Runner and put a nose cone on it, along with a giant rear wing, to homologate the super-slippery, aerodynamic bodyshape for NASCAR. Unfortunately, they were not able to sell them all immediately due to the unusual front end styling. This yellow example stole my eye for a good amount of time at Hershey’s AACA meet this fall and I couldn’t stop staring at it. Enjoy the photos. Continue reading Yellow Superbird at the 2018 Hershey AACA Fall Meet

Dodge Mirada at the AACA Fall Meet, Hershey

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Here we have a bit of a Malaise Mopar Unicorn. While everyone knew the Chrysler Cordoba, the Dodge twin of it was always less common during the period. The Mirada, produced only from 1980-1983, is the final iteration of the RWD Dodge personal coupe, and was the last four-seat 2 door RWD domestically produced vehicle under the brand name until the Challenger came out in 2008. This was one of the most well-preserved examples I’ve seen in a very long time, and ran quiet as a church mouse. Enjoy the photos of this rarely-seen Mopar classic. Continue reading Dodge Mirada at the AACA Fall Meet, Hershey

Plymouth Sapporo Technica at Radwood Philly

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Once upon a time, Dodge made a great car called the Challenger. Then, in the late 1970s, they had their first stab at bringing the great name back. But, reality was hard on the new Challenger. It was based on a dowdy Mitsubishi Galant Lambda, and its Plymouth counterpart shown here, the Sapporo, wasn’t exactly a paragon of technology, speed, or style. But, someone brought this example to Radwood, and I had to say I was impressed. It’s not perfect, but Plymouth’s desire to bring a small, sporty coupe with Japanese dynamics and American style (or some of it) to the market is clear through this black-and-silver Technica. I don’t think I’ll see another one of these anytime soon, so I took in as much as I could. Enjoy the photos. Continue reading Plymouth Sapporo Technica at Radwood Philly

Want a cheap Range Rover? Not after watching this, you won’t.

Range Rovers may be great when they’re new, but buy a used one, and the phrase “buyer beware” takes on a new and very sinister meaning. Here, Tyler Hoover, aka “Hoovie” of Hoovie’s Garage gives us the quick and dirty reasons why you should run away as fast as possible from old Range Rovers unless you know what you’re doing.

-Albert S. Davis

The two most colorful GM products at Hershey? Of course!

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Bright red doesn’t work on every car, and until last month I wouldn’t have put it as a good color on a 1966 Toronado. I also wouldn’t have put yellow up as a good color on a 1977 Firebird, but combined with the Formula appearance package, it works like a charm. I’m glad I was there to shoot these two, however briefly it was. Hopefully they make a repeat appearance at Hershey next year. Continue reading The two most colorful GM products at Hershey? Of course!

1974 Pontiac GTO at the 2018 AACA Hershey Fall Meet

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If there was an ugly duckling year for the Pontiac GTO, this would be it. No longer a trim level of the midsize Lemans series, the GTO was moved to an embarrassing option package on the compact Ventura two-door coupe and hatchback. What was once the original muscle car and Pontiac’s ace in the hole had turned into a weird looking bug-eyed car that got less credit than it should have. This retina-scorched yellow example is the first 1974 model I’ve seen that wasn’t in a book, and with its very Mid-Seventies interior, is one of very few left like it. I liked the Shaker hood too–an unusual option for even that year. Enjoy the photos of this strange historical footnote in Pontiac history. Continue reading 1974 Pontiac GTO at the 2018 AACA Hershey Fall Meet

Series 1 E-Type Jaguar Convertible at the 2018 Scarsdale Concours

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The Series 1 Jaguar E-Type is to this day one of the finest-looking automobiles to ever leave England. Here in America, it’s a regular at most Concours and regular classic car events. This dark blue Roadster made its mark in Scarsdale, but was hidden behind a few other cars on the main drag. No matter–it was found, and I was satisfied. Enjoy the photos of this beautiful British classic. Continue reading Series 1 E-Type Jaguar Convertible at the 2018 Scarsdale Concours

C126 Mercedes-Benz 560 SEC at Radwood Philly

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Yesterday, Nick shared with us a Porsche 928 with fake drugs on the armrest. Today, I’m sharing with you a Mercedes that the Porsche owner’s dealer (not a kingpin, but a dealer who makes plenty of money) would drive. I’m a sucker for the 560SEC of the Eighties, and this example is one of the straightest I’ve seen in a long time. From the turquoise paint to the Monoblock wheels (which may not be stock but certainly give this big coupe the rake it deserves) and the immaculate interior to the frameless windows, I was hooked. Enjoy the photos of this Eighties (and early Nineties) leather-lined Panzer tank. Continue reading C126 Mercedes-Benz 560 SEC at Radwood Philly

Welcome to the E38–or, the best 7 Series ever produced.

When I was a kid, my friend’s dad gave me a lift home in his brand new 1999 BMW 740iL. I was blown away by how nice it was to just sit in even as a nine year old. Since then I’ve wanted a BMW 7-Series from this generation. Here, Doug Demuro walks us through the highest end version of the era–the 750iL V12 with the M Sport package. Enjoy the video.

-Albert S. Davis