Category Archives: Automotive Lifestyle

What does a car-enthused lifestyle look like?

Mercedes SLS AMG Spotted at dinner the other night

Mercedes SLS AMG Spotted 2

When we rolled up to meet my parents at dinner this weekend, we saw this clean SLS AMG parked out front of the restaurant. It’s been a while since I’ve seen one in a random situation, and really is a handsome machine in a real world setting. With its thundering 6.2L naturally aspirated V8, the SLS remains one of the best sounding cars out there.

-Nick

Mercedes SLS AMG Spotted 3 Mercedes SLS AMG Spotted 1

Advertisements

Take a flyweight Datsun with a turbo small block. Take a heavy Chevy with a blown big block. Mix well!

Roadkill has become my favorite YouTube show over the past few years. The reason is pretty easy to understand–take old cars, two guys who’ve seen everything about old cars for years, and a sense of humor that I can relate to (since I’ve been stuck working on two old cars for two years now), and the formula comes together. In this episode, Finnegan’s beat-up old Datsun 240Z, packing heat from a small block Ford with a turbo off a diesel F-Series HD, takes to the track against a car they built for Mighty Car Mods, a 1969 Chevy Impala with the same engine from the Crusher Camaro, a famous Hot Rod Magazine build–this time, it’s a 427 ci Chevrolet big block topped with a mean-looking supercharger. Who’s going to win this battle? Find out by clicking “Play”! Grab the popcorn (or Hot Pockets, or beer, or whiskey), this is a good one.

Doug Demuro says what needs to be said about the Porsche 996… it’s great, forget the haters.

I’ve been saying 996 hate is largely unfounded for years. My dad bought a 1999 Carrera back in 2007, and here we are 10 years later, over 100,000 miles on it, and it’s still great. He did the IMS bearing when he did the clutch within a year of buying the car, and he hasn’t had to do anything but basic maintenance since.

It’s a phenomenal car to drive as well, a real pure 911 experience. 300hp, 2,900lbs, a crisp six speed manual, sharp steering, and rear wheel drive with a limited slip differential, what’s not to love about that? If you’re a hater you either haven’t driven a 996, or you’re a car snob with far more access to fine cars than the average person could ever hope for. Sure, if you’re accustomed to driving a 997 GT3 RS all the time, then a 996 Carrera is a few steps backward. But for most drivers the basic 996s are a phenomenal sports car experience, and I think they should be recognized as such.

-Nick

 

Motor Trend’s very honest look at the new Lexus LC500

I’m a big fan of the new Lexus LC 500, but we all need to remember that it’s not a high performance F model, at least not yet. This is the best review I’ve seen yet.

Also, it weighs a hell of a lot more than I expected, almost 4,400 lbs. I hope they find a way to take some weight out when they do make the F version.

Enjoy!

-Nick

What American Muscle Car would I buy on a $15k budget?

$15,000 is an interesting price point if you’re looking for a solid muscle car. You can have most of the early-mid 2000’s contenders with reasonable miles on them, or you can have one of the newer 400+hp options with higher miles.

I’m more on the high performance side of things, rather than wanting a muscle car for the style just to cruise in. I do intend to do burnouts, I do intend to explore the car’s high speed capabilities, and I do expect it to handle corners competently. Also, there is no such thing as a muscle car with 4 or 6 cylinders, so 8 cylinders is a given here. Lastly, a manual transmission is a must for me. This is a car to be driven, not an outfit to wear.

I should also state up front that I am pretty much non-partisan when it comes to American Muscle cars or American car brands. I know there are those who live and die by Ford, GM, or Mopar, and for them the $15k choice is a lot simpler.

My top 3 options for a $15,000 muscle car are as follows…

Continue reading What American Muscle Car would I buy on a $15k budget?

Sponsored: Driving with K40 watching my back

K40 RSL2 Radar Detector

When you’re a performance driving enthusiast, you may find yourself at odds with law enforcement from time to time. As long as there have been speed limits, and cars that are capable of exceeding them, this cat and mouse game has been played between the cops and joyriders. You could say it is an integral part of our way of life.

The way I see it, getting a speeding ticket every so often is just a cost of doing business if you want to drive fast on the road. It is totally impossible to enjoy a sports car within the posted speed limit, so you either have to bend the rules a bit, keep your fast driving 100% to the occasional track day, or give up and find a new hobby. I’m far to passionate about cars to just give up the lifestyle, and unfortunately my ass isn’t tightly wound enough to keep things only to the race track, so yes, I speed on the road, and I accept the risks of doing so.

I think the key to having fast fun out on the road and staying both safe and ticket-free is picking the time and place you speed wisely. Don’t be hooning around in towns, don’t fly past an obvious police hiding spot, and most importantly, don’t put other people at risk. There are plenty of opportunities to go as fast as you want, when the conditions are right and the road is open, so there’s no need to force the issue when it isn’t.

That approach alone will save you from most tickets, but there are those random, out of nowhere, cases where you are surprised by the police at a very inopportune moment. To help guard, you need equipment to detect the police on the prowl where you cannot see.

Enter K40 Electronics, and their world class line of police detection equipment. They sent me their portable RLS2 Radar Detector, and I’ve been using it every day for the last few months, sometimes on spirited drives, but mostly going to and from work. So far it has had me covered in both.

Continue reading Sponsored: Driving with K40 watching my back

The new 991.2 GT3 looks to be a masterpiece

We’ll see how if fares with the manual transmission soon enough, but so far so good. Also, quite smart for Porsche to release the PDK version first and keep us waiting for the stick-shift. It will double their media exposure.

Enjoy the sound of 4.0L at 9,000 RPM!

-Nick