Tag Archives: American Cars

Callaway C12 Corvette at Cars and Caffe

Callaway C12 Corvette Cars and Caffe 4

This is the first Callaway C12 Corvette I’ve ever seen in person. I had the 1/18 AutoArt model as a kid, and I always loved its sleek design. Underneath the C12 was based on the C5 Corvette, but it was totally overhauled into the racing-derived exotic supercar you see here. Back in 1999 when a brand new C5 Vette sold for around $40,000 and did 177mph, the Callaway C12 sold for $200,000 and could reach +/- 200mph. Back in the late-90s / early-00s that was incredible performance, right on par with top tier supercars of the day.

There’s a very good reason I hadn’t seen one in person until now, and that’s because only 25 C12s were built. It’s quite a rare car, one coveted by collectors, and it was awesome to finally lay eyes on one in the flesh. Enjoy!

Continue reading Callaway C12 Corvette at Cars and Caffe

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This 1938 Packard was V12 Pimpin’ before Pimpin’ was Pimp

Packard Twelve 1608 Derham 10

Look at this beautiful blue Packard. This is the swooping shape of American luxury of old, complete with a V12 under the hood. So many fine details, and it oozes elegance.

Enjoy the gallery!

Continue reading This 1938 Packard was V12 Pimpin’ before Pimpin’ was Pimp

1932 Lincoln KB Boattail Speedster, by Marcel DeLay

32 Lincoln KB Boattail Speedster 2

It’s been a while since we featured something antique and swoopy. This is one of the early Lincoln V12s, and it wears a unique and beautiful body. It was one of the stars of the Radnor Hunt Concours this year.

Enjoy the gallery!

Continue reading 1932 Lincoln KB Boattail Speedster, by Marcel DeLay

Classic Mopars at the AACA Fall Meet, Hershey, PA

1971 Dodge Demon 340

I regret that I showed up late for this event. In fact, I showed up so late that I managed to miss most of the show. While I ate plenty of crow for that, I got to see most of the show leave along the exit road, and learned that at the AACA meet, always expect the unexpected. Among these Mopars featured today include the usual suspects, such as Superbirds and a Hemi car or two. However, take a good look at that 1942 DeSoto–one of the rarest years of the brand and a car almost never seen even by keen-eyed enthusiasts. My personal favorite? Take a good look at the cover photo. I have not seen many two-door late C-Body New Yorker coupes, and a black over tan example caught my eye and never gave it back. Enjoy the photos of these classic Chrysler products, and byproducts. Continue reading Classic Mopars at the AACA Fall Meet, Hershey, PA

Some Highlights from Cars and Caffe at Garden State Plaza

Porsche Carrera GTs at Garden State Plaza

Cars and Caffe at Garden State Plaza was incredible yesterday. I hadn’t been before, and I didn’t really expect it to be quite as big an event as it was. There were thousands of people, and hundreds of cars, many of which were top-tier hypercars. The Holy Trinity was in attendance, as well as 2 Paganis, 4 or 5 Carrera GTs, an F50, Ben Chen’s Panda Bugatti, and Team Salamone’s incredible Avantador SV.¬†Also of note, I finally got to see my first Callaway C12 Corvette in person, after having the AutoArt model on my shelf for years.

There were some great sights and sounds throughout the day, and I was blown away with the turnout. It’s kind of crazy to see people rolling up in a cars like a Ferrari 488 and barely being noticed. The rest of the parking lot was a sea of Ferraris, McLarens, Lamborghinis, and Porsches. I will definitely plan on attending the events next year, and I urge everyone in the Tri-State Area to do the same.

Enjoy these highlights. There’s a lot more to come!

Continue reading Some Highlights from Cars and Caffe at Garden State Plaza

1962 Pontiac Grand Prix “Super Duty” at the Haskell Car Show

1962 Grand Prix SD Front

People always say that the Pontiac GTO was the first muscle car to hit the streets. They’d be right, and they are right. However, it would be unfair to say it came out of nowhere. Pontiac was making some serious performance strides in the years prior to the GTO hitting the market, and it started to grow some teeth very well with the 421 big block V8 in the early Sixties. This black ’62 Grand Prix ticks all the boxes for an early full-size American land yacht running a racing engine. The obligatory “triple deuces” 3x2bbl carburetor configuration is present and accounted for, along with the four speed manual transmission, positive traction rear end, and very unusual 8-lug wheels (which were designed for better brake cooling). Top it off with some black paint and red leather, and you have a recipe for a handsome and stupid-fast cruise liner. Continue reading 1962 Pontiac Grand Prix “Super Duty” at the Haskell Car Show

1957 Chevrolet Bel-Air Convertible at the Radnor Hunt Concours

1957 Chevrolet Bel Air Convertible Front

The Chevrolet Bel Air is as American as baseball, hot dogs, and apple pie. It’s also, especially in the flashy 1957 trim, one of the most recognizable stars of the 1950s. Chevy started their action by putting out their first OHV V8 in 1955, then made waves with the chrome-slathered styling just two years later. Augmenting that with the Dagmar front bumper points, classy knockoff style wheel covers, and dual antennas, they got plenty of attention from critics, and from the American public. Sales were fantastic, and Chevy hasn’t gotten their mainstream cars to be as stylish since then. GM hit the ground running in 1957–just like the Detroit Lions, who won their final (to date) championship that year. One could say that GM styling peaked the same year their football team did (although there are plenty of examples that prove otherwise). Enjoy the photos of this true American classic. Continue reading 1957 Chevrolet Bel-Air Convertible at the Radnor Hunt Concours

1976 Cadillac Fleetwood at the 2017 Misselwood Concours

1976 Cadillac Fleetwood Front 1

Sometimes, a car shows up at a Concours that you wouldn’t expect to see. Citroen 2CVs don’t usually belong, unless they’re picture perfect. Most Malaise-Era cars aren’t usually welcome unless they’ve got a prancing horse, raging bull, or a trident adorning the hood. Well, say hello to the Wreath and Crest, packing a Seventies punch at Misselwood. A Fleetwood may lack the pizazz and the outright ostentatiousness of the Eldorado in 1976 but it was still the most expensive Caddy sedan on the showroom floor that year. This example has covered under 50 thousand miles and carries all of its original paint, bodywork, and interior to this day. I’ve been a fan of the ’76 for years, thanks in no small part to the fact that just a year later, GM turned the magnificent Cadillac into a shadow of its former self. Enjoy the photos of this big, mean, red machine. Continue reading 1976 Cadillac Fleetwood at the 2017 Misselwood Concours

The Cannonball Run! (sort of) at the Greenwich Concours

Alex Roy's BMW M5

No matter what your fancy is, some of the best cars from the famous Cannonball Run were on display at the Greenwich Concours this year. Whether it’s the homage #144 Polezei BMW M5 driven by Alex Roy some years ago across America (a world record winner), the Chevy Malibu police car (my personal favorite), or the Dodge Tradesman ambulance, there was a smorgasbord in attendance. They even had Dan Gurney and Brock Yates’ Ferrari Daytona in attendance–the winner of the second race, and one of the more infamous cross-country cars still around. These cars were true crowd-pleasers, and even Nick, who normally laughs at Malaise-Era stuff, found the Dodge to be amusing (especially when the open exhaust announced the sound of a completely un-muffled small block Dodge). Enjoy the photos of these offbeat rides. Continue reading The Cannonball Run! (sort of) at the Greenwich Concours

1967 Pontiac GTO at the Misselwood Concours

1967 Pontiac GTO Front

Pontiac, before General Motors decided to kill the brand, made some of my favorite mid-priced cars. While some scorn and say that they were just Chevrolets with some extra body cladding, there was a time where that just wasn’t true. Back in the 1960s, John Z. Delorean wanted to put some pep in the General’s step–and he decided to use a time honored formula of taking a big engine and cramming it into a car smaller than normal. The new Tempest was a great candidate, being Pontiac’s newest intermediate in 1964, so it was chosen. Then, a 389 cubic inch V8 was bolted in, and the car was sent off to showrooms.
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