Tag Archives: British Cars

Aston Martin DBAR1 Zagato at Amelia Island

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This elegant barchetta by Zagato is still my personal favorite modern Aston Martin. The wail of a naturally aspirated V12, operated via a manual gearbox, with the wind in your hair… it’s just about perfect!

-Nick

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Highlights from the 2018 Cars and Caffe Season Opener

Here are some highlights from the Cars and Caffe Season Opener. It’s a little late because I came down with a really nasty flu right after the show, so I’m playing a bit of catch up.

Enjoy this taste of much more to come from this phenomenal event. If you live in the northeastern US, it’s really worth the trip.

-Nick

Jaguar XJR-15 at Cars and Coffee Amelia Island

Jaguar XJR-15 Cars and Coffee 5

Following up the Mercedes CLK GTR from last week, here is yet another 90’s unicorn we saw this year at Amelia Island, a Jaguar XJR-15. One of just 53 produced, it is the road going version of the 24hrs of LeMans-winning XJR-9 racecar. I mean, just look at the interior, and how the seats are just molded right onto the carbon tub. It’s an extreme experience to be sure.

We’ve seen this car a few times before, it’s been a staple of the Amelia Island scene every time we’ve been, but this was the nicest setting I’ve been able to shoot it in. Enjoy!

Continue reading Jaguar XJR-15 at Cars and Coffee Amelia Island

1936 Lagonda LG45 at the Amelia Island Concours

1936 Lagonda LG45 Amelia 9

With a top speed of around 100mph, this striking blue Lagonda was one of the fastest British cars of its day. It was so fast, in fact, that a Lagonda 4.5L won LeMans the year before this car was made. You can see the rest of the details on this car in the image below.

What really drew me to this car was its distinctive color combo and its awesome hood ornament. The color is almost like BMW’s Laguna Seca Blue, and the interior is chocolate leather with light wood trim. It’s a gorgeous combination! As for the hood ornament, it’s a native gentleman fighting a snake with a hatchet. Quite an epic scene to witness as you drive along.

Enjoy the gallery of this magnificent classic Brit!

Continue reading 1936 Lagonda LG45 at the Amelia Island Concours

A Tiny Peel Trident Spotted at Amelia Island

Peel Trident Amelia Island

The Peel Trident is one of the smallest motor cars on Earth, and this was the first time I’ve seen one go by on the street. It’s comical seeing a car so tiny zipping along on its own power with an average size person driving it. Honestly, I just burst out laughing.

-Nick

Evo Shows Us Around the McLaren Senna

The details of the McLaren Senna are immense. This may be the most track-focused version of a supercar to-date… to the point where the car is actually illegal for road use in Race Mode.

It’s a badass car for badass people who live badass lives. People who will walk out of Starbucks with a big straw in a small iced latte, J-walk to their car across the street, and drive off in Race Mode right in front of a cop. Hell yeah, unlike airflow, society can’t hold this thing down!

-Nick

Triumph TR8 at the Bergen Cars and Coffee

Triumph TR8 Rear (1)

Triumph fans don’t like the TR7 at all. The cheese-wedge lines, safety bumpers, awkward finishing lines, and too-small wheels don’t combine to make a pretty picture. Luckily, Triumph wasn’t as dim as we all thought, and grabbed the 3.5L Buick V8 that Rover was using. They shoehorned it into the TR7 and made the TR8 a reality. It wasn’t perfect, but it was at least quick enough that no one knew it was a TR7 with a better engine. These are curiosities today, but this example was too nice to pass up.

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1973 Triumph Stag at the 2017 Radnor Hunt Concours

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Triumph’s TR series was excellent, until the bender hit rock bottom in 1980 with the cheese-wedge TR7. Luckily, one of their brightest spots outside of that series was the striking little Stag, released in 1970 and pulled from the lineup in 1978. They weren’t without their flaws, but the body style, looks, and driving dynamics were above par in the Seventies. Just don’t keep it too long, or you’d be seeing your mechanic more often than a home-cooked meal. While far from the best car money could buy, it was a fun car for the times and still had plenty of appeal. This particular brown example shone brightly at the Radnor Hunt Concours last fall.

Triumph Stag Interior//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Triumph Stag Rear//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

-Albert S. Davis

The Senna is awesome, but please stop calling it a “hypercar”

The new McLaren Senna is sure to be many things, but I really don’t think it should be considered a “hypercar.” Yes, that’s right, while most others are writing the same sort of ass-kissing articles about the Senna, I’m over here with my critic hat on.

Don’t get me wrong, I like the Senna a lot, and I’m sure it will be fast in ways not thought possible, but performance alone doesn’t constitute what makes a hypercar a hypercar. In fact, I’d say it’s traditional for the next generation of track-focused supercars to exceed the performance of the previous generation’s hypercars. I mean, the Porsche GT2 RS just shattered the 918’s Nürburgring time, but does anyone consider that a hypercar?

To me, the Senna seems pretty much the 720S equivalent of the 675LT in the previous generation, an ultra hardcore track-focused version of the McLaren Super Series car. Now, it does seem as though the Senna is an even more of a step up over the 720S than the 675LT was over the 650S. They’ve definitely raised the stakes here, so if the 675LT was the 650S turned up to 11, then the Senna is the 720S turned up to 12. But, faster lap times or not, that sure as hell doesn’t put it at the relative level of a P1, let alone the legendary F1.

Continue reading The Senna is awesome, but please stop calling it a “hypercar”