Tag Archives: Racing Cars

1955 Ferrari 750 Monza at Amelia Island

1955 Ferrari 750 Monza 1

This is how Ferrari does a 4 banger, to race competitively in the lower displacement classes. The 750 Monza was an evolution of the Ferrari 500 Mondial. It featured a larger 3.0L inline four that produced a healthy 250hp… very healthy indeed when you consider this car only weighs 1,600 lbs.

This 750 Monza showed up outside the Ritz Carlton during the Amelia Island Concours Weekend. It was quite stunning. Enjoy!

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Ferrari 166 MM at Amelia Island

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This immaculate Ferrari 166 MM is one of those restorations that almost certainly looks better today than the day it left the factory. Keep in mind, these cars were originally built for sports car racing, and the MM in the name stands for Mille Miglia – arguably the most insane road race of all time. Beauty was secondary to the this Ferrari’s original function, but now that it’s a classic, worth millions of dollars, beauty has become its primary purpose. Given that change, it makes sense that the workmanship would take a step up during the restoration. Racecars are mean to be pushed to destruction in the pursuit of victory, show cars are meant to be a timeless spectacle for the eye.

Looking at these photos, it seems this Ferrari 166 MM has made that jump, and they did a spectacular job with it.

Enjoy!

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That time I saw Sir Stirling Moss driving the 300 SLR 722 at Pebble Beach

Mercedes 300 SLR 722 Stirling Moss

Taking a trip down memory lane, looking through the photos I’ve taken over the years, I stumbled across this gem from Pebble Beach in 2011. It’s none other than Sir Stirling Moss, and he’s driving the legendary Mercedes 300 SLR 722 in which he won the 1955 Mille Miglia. He set the all-time speed record for the Mille Miglia that year, and it has never been beaten.  I realized I hadn’t shared it yet, and it definitely needed to be published.

Sir Stirling Moss is a gentleman about as epic as they come. His wit is hysterical in conversation, and he’s an absolutely fearless driver. Stirling didn’t just put-put the SLR around at the event either. No, after I snapped the shot above, he took the 722 down to the shoreline for a quick photo-op, and then proceeded to absolutely flog the car up the side road behind the lodge. The crowd had moved on while Sir Stirling was having his photo-op, and everyone was astonished and surprised as the SLR’s racing-spec straight-six was fully unleashed, tires screeched, and we all saw a silver flash pass between the openings between buildings. The sound was delicious to our ears, and I was beyond thrilled to see the man himself give it the beans for old time’s sake.

Sure, the 300 SLR 722 is about as valuable as a car can be, easily worth $50 million + if it ever went to auction, but who better to let it rip than the man who still know’s it best? It’s a moment I will surely never forget.

More photos of the car from Pebble Beach below, as well as two videos about Sir Stirling Moss and this most-insane Mercedes racecar.

Mercedes 300 SLR 722 Stirling Moss 2Mercedes 300 SLR 722 Pebble Beach 1 Mercedes 300 SLR 722 Pebble Beach  2

Petrolicious on the 1955 Milli Miglia:

My video from a press conference Sir Stirling held at Lime Rock:

Prepare to want a Jaguar D-Type quite badly

The folks at Petrolicious never fail to arose the agony of desire in my soul. I would commit any number of crimes just to be able to drive a Jaguar D-Type for 15 minutes, but the owner of this car has driven it over 20,000 miles. I can only imagine what that has been like!

-Nick

This 1939 Delage D6 3 Liter Gran Prix is from the last glory days of French racing

1939 Delage D6 3 Liter Grand Prix 2

1939, we all know what was happening in Europe at that time, but on the brink of the second World War, this Delage was competing in the last races before the onset of mass destruction.

It was the end of an era for the automobile, and after the war things would be faster, but they sure wouldn’t look as good. I mean look at the swooping fenders on this thing, it was as much about style as it was about speed. Pre-war era racing was a unique time in automotive history, one that will never be equalled in many respects. Racing had a lot more charm back then, it was more dangerous for it, but that also added to the appeal.

Enjoy daydreaming about this French masterpiece!

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1966 Porsche 906/Carrera 6 Racecar at Radnor Hunt

Porsche 906 Carrera 6 Racecar Radnor Hunt 2

The Porsche 906 comes from the end of the era when racing cars really could be used on public roads. I mean, imagine a LeMans LMP car blitzing past you on the highway today. It’s a pretty incredible thought, and that’s exactly what the Porsche 906 was.

Just 50 Porsche 906s were produced, and they’re all worth millions of dollars at auction today. I haven’t seen one since my visit to the Porsche Museum in Stuttgart a few years ago, and this was really the first time I’ve looked closely at one.

Like so many Porsches over the years, the 906 won’t shock you with its raw numbers. It’s 2.0L flat six produces 220hp, or a little less than a modern Honda S2000. Not too crazy, right? Well, when you consider it also only weighs 1,280lbs, you’ll find the 906 has a better power-to-weight ratio than the current 991 GT3 RS, even with its mighty 4.0L engine.

Ah, the merits of lightness…

Enjoy the photos.

Continue reading 1966 Porsche 906/Carrera 6 Racecar at Radnor Hunt

The Paddock at Lime Rock: Ferrari 250 TR and Maserati 300 S

Ferrari 250 TR Maserati 300S at Lime Rock

They say a picture is worth 1,000 words. Well, this one is worth that, plus around $30-40 million. These two legendary Italian racing cars sat side together, waiting to greet us as we began our day at the Lime Rock Historics. It’s great to see they’re still being used as intended after all these years, even despite their substantial value. Racecars should be raced, plain and simple. They aren’t meant to be paperweights.

-Nick